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Posts Tagged ‘VU. ENG101 -. ENGLISH. COMPREHENSION .(Session – 3 ). MIDTERM .EXAMINATION .FALL .2007’

VU ENG101 – ENGLISH COMPREHENSION (Session – 3 ) MIDTERM EXAMINATION FALL 2007

.

MIDTERM EXAMINATION

FALL 2007 Marks: 30

ENG101 – ENGLISH COMPREHENSION (Session – 3 ) Time: 120min

StudentID/LoginID: ______________________________

Student Name: ______________________________

Center Name/Code: ______________________________

Exam Date: Tuesday, December 04, 2007

Instructions

Please read the following instructions carefully before attempting any of the

questions:

1. Attempt all questions. Marks are written adjacent to each question.

2. Mistakes in spelling, punctuation and grammar may be penalized in any part

of the paper.

3. Read the passage given below carefully before answering any question.

4. USE A PEN FOR ATTEMPTING THE PAPER.ANY PAPER SOLVED IN

PENCIL WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. Do not use any erasable material for

attempting the paper.

5. Do not ask any question about the contents of this examination from anyone.

a. If you think that there is something wrong with any of the question,

attempt it to the best of your understanding.

b. If you believe that some essential piece of information is missing, make

an appropriate assumption and use it to solve the problem.

c. Write all steps, missing steps may lead to deduction of marks.

**WARNING: Please note that Virtual University takes serious note of unfair means.

Anyone found involved in cheating will get an `F` grade in this course.

Passage

Alexander the Great had placed himself before the relief at Persepolis, the richest city in all

Persia. He had just come through rooms in which beautiful tapestries covered the walls.

.

Earlier he had seen, in one of the several palatial residences, caskets made from Lebanon

cedar, their wooden sides engraved, and decorated with gold and silver. He had admired the

high ceilings, supported by fluted columns that held aloft carvings of bulls and griffins.

Now he carefully studied the figures that had been chiseled into the outer stone walls. The

dress on some of the figures represented the attire in lands that Alexander had already

claimed for himself. The costumes on yet other carved figures represented people in lands

that were still part of the vast Persian Empire. These were lands that Alexander planned to

conquer. The people shown taking tributes to the Persian King were people whom Alexander

intended to subjugate.

Alexander the Great was eager to move on to these distant lands, but his colleagues, who had

downed large amounts of wine, stumbled around in a drunken stupor. Their inebriated

minds stirred up within them a desire for revenge. They wanted to make the Persians pay for

the damage a former Persian king, Xerxes, had done after invading Athens, more than 150

years earlier. Goaded by these drunken men and beguiled by members of his harem,

Alexander the Great ordered the burning of Persepolis.

Men and women, holding aloft flaming torches, raced up and down the terraces of Persepolis.

Flames ignited the wooden beams of the palaces once built by Xerxes. Looters fought off the

heat of the inferno in order to drag out gold vessels, and to tear silver rings from heavy

draperies.

When the fires had died out, all that remained were the tall stone columns and the exquisite

stone carvings on the outer walls. Alexander the Great had left, for discovery by future

visitors, the Persian soldiers who were untouched by the leaping flames. These “Immortals”

still march today in precise formation across the chiseled stone remains of Persepolis.

For Teacher’s use only

Question 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Total

Marks

Question 11 12

Marks

Question No: 1 ( Marks: 2 )

Use the information in the given passage to answer these questions:

Which Persian city did Alexander the Great set afire?

Question No: 2 ( Marks: 3 )

How did the Persians decorate the tall columns of Persepolis?

Question No: 3 ( Marks: 2 )

The burning of Persepolis was intended as?

Question No: 4 ( Marks: 3 )

.

Are the ruins of Persepolis something you would like to see? Briefly comment.

Question No: 5 ( Marks: 10 )

Write a précis of the given passage. (Précis should be precise and must not have

quotes from the passage)

Question No: 6 ( Marks: 1 ) – Please choose one

Choose the best option from the choices given below:

Which of the following did Alexander the Great not find at Persepolis?

tapestries hanging on walls

fluted columns

none of the above

Question No: 7 ( Marks: 1 ) – Please choose one

Which of the following did Alexander’s men take from Persepolis?

gold vessels

silver rings

both a and b

Question No: 8 ( Marks: 1 ) – Please choose one

Alexander the Great set fire to Persepolis because Xerxes put a torch to:

Athens

Alexandria

Rome

Question No: 9 ( Marks: 1 ) – Please choose one

The Persians brought cedar from _____________________ to Persepolis.

Lebanon

.

Griffins

Tyre

Question No: 10 ( Marks: 1 ) – Please choose one

Griffin is a creature from Greek mythology.

True

False

Question No: 11 ( Marks: 1 ) – Please choose one

What Persian king had set Athens afire?

Xerxes

Alexander

Question No: 12 ( Marks: 4 )

A synonym is a word with a similar or identical meaning to another. Give one synonym for

each of the words given below (the first letter each word has been given to help you).

e.g. Necessity e……… essential

1. commiserate c….……

2. protest c………..

3. venture s………..

4. sympathy k……….

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